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The Leonardo Book Series


The Robot inthe Garden

Edited by Ken Goldberg

The Robot in the Garden initiates a critical theory of telerobotics and introduces telepistemology, the study of knowledge acquired at a distance. Many of our most influential technologies, the telescope, telephone, and television, were developed to provide knowledge at a distance. Telerobots, remotely controlled robots, facilitate action at a distance. Specialists use telerobots to explore actively environments such as Mars, the Titanic, and Chernobyl. Military personnel increasingly employ reconnaissance drones and telerobotic missiles. At home, we have remote controls for the garage door, car alarm, and television (the latter a remote for the remote).

The Internet dramatically extends our scope and reach. Thousands of cameras and robots are now accessible online. Although the role of technical mediation has been of interest to philosophers since the seventeenth century, the Internet forces a reconsideration. As the public gains access to telerobotic instruments previously restricted to scientists and soldiers, questions of mediation, knowledge, and trust take on new significance for everyday life.

Telerobotics is a mode of representation. But representations can misrepresent. If Orson Welles's "War of the Worlds" was the defining moment for radio, what will be the defining moment for the Internet? As artists have always been concerned with how representations provide us with knowledge, the book also looks at telerobotics' potential as an artistic medium.

Contributors: Albert Borgmann, Tom Campanella, John Canny, Judith Donath, Hubert Dreyfus, Ken Goldberg, Alvin Goldman, Oliver Grau, Marina Grzinic, Blake Hannaford, Michael Idinopulos, Martin Jay, Eduardo Kac, Machiko Kusahara, Jeff Malpas, Lev Manovich, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Eric Paulos, Catherine Wilson.

March 2000
The MIT Press
A Leonardo Book
ISBN: 0-262-07203-3
330 pp., 49 illus., $35.00/£21.95 (cloth)

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Art and Innovation: The Xerox PARC Artist-in-Residence Program

Edited by Craig Harris

The idea behind Xerox's interdisciplinary Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) is simple: if you put creative people in a hothouse setting, innovation will naturally emerge. PARC's Artist-in-Residence Program (PAIR) brings artists who use new media to PARC and pairs them with researchers who often use the same media, though in different contexts. This is radically different from most corporate support of the arts, where there is little intersection between the disciplines. The result is both interesting and new scientific innovations.

Art and Innovation explores the unique process that grew from this pairing of new media artists and scientists working at the frontier of developing technologies. In addition to discussing specific works created during several long-term residencies, the artists and researchers reveal the similarities and differences in their approaches and perspectives as they engage each other in a search for new methods for communication and creativity.

Contributors: Marshall Bern, David Biegelsen, Michael Black, Jeanette Blomberg, John Seely Brown, Margaret Crane, Paul De Marinis, Jeanne C. Finley, Rich Gold, Craig Harris, Steve Harrison, David Levy, Constance Lewallen, Dale MacDonald, Judy Malloy, Cathy Marshall, Scott Minneman, John Muse, Susan Newman, Joel Slayton, Lucy Suchman, Randy Trigg, Stephen Wilson, Jon Winet, Pamela Z.

June 1999
The MIT Press
A Leonardo Book
ISBN: 0-262-08275-6
264 pp., 90 illus., 8 color

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The Digital Dialectic: New Essays on New Media

Edited by Peter Lunenfeld

Computers linked to networks have created the first broadly used systems that allow individuals to create, distribute, and receive audiovisual content with the same box. They challenge theorists of digital culture to develop interaction-based models to replace the more primitive models that allow only passive use.

The Digital Dialectic is an interdisciplinary jam session about our visual and intellectual cultures as the computer recodes technologies, media, and art forms. Unlike purely academic texts on new media, the book includes contributions by scholars, artists, and entrepreneurs, who combine theoretical investigations with hands-on analysis of the possibilities (and limitations) of new technology. The key concept is the digital dialectic: a method to ground the insights of theory in the constraints of practice. The essays move beyond journalistic reportage and hype into serious but accessible discussion of new technologies, new media, and new cultural forms.

Contributors: Florian Brody, Carol Gigliotti, N. Katherine Hayles, Michael Heim, Erkki Huhtamo, George P. Landow, Brenda Laurel, Peter Lunenfeld, Lev Manovich, William J. Mitchell, Bob Stein.

May 1999
The MIT Press
A Leonardo Book
ISBN: 0-262-12213-8
320 pp., 50 illus.

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Technoromanticism

by Richard Coyne

"This is an excellent and most welcome study of the discourse about computer communications, their narrativity as Coyne says, with particular attention to the classic theme of unity and fragmentation."
-- Mark Poster, Professor of History and of Information and Computer Science, University of California at Irvine
Many commentators place the computer--with its promises of interconnectivity, subversion of hierarchy, restoration of the tribe, revitalism of democracy, and new holism--at the pinnacle of scientific and technological accomplishment. Yet such narratives are grounded in the Enlightenment and romantic traditions. In this book Richard Coyne explores the spectrum of romantic narrative that pervades the digital age, from McLuhan's utopian vision of social reintegration by electronic communication to claims that cyberspace creates new realities.

Technoromanticism pits itself against a hard-headed rationalism, but its most potent antagonists are contemporary pragmatism, phenomenology, hermeneutics, surrealism, and deconstruction--all of which infect and subvert the romantic legacy and in turn provoke new narratives of computing. Thus the book also serves as an introduction to the application of contemporary theory to information technology, raising issues of representation, space, time, interpretation, identity, and the real. As such it provides a companion volume to Coyne's Designing Information Technology in the Postmodern Age: From Method to Metaphor (MIT Press, 1995).

July 1999
The MIT Press
A Leonardo Book
ISBN: 0-262-03260-0
384 pp.

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Immersed in Technology: Art and Virtual Environments

Edited by Mary Anne Moser and Douglas MacLeod

The Banff Centre for the Arts has become synonymous for what's hot in the electronic arts, a place where professional artists come to produce new work and develop new skills. This book brings together critical essays along with artists' projects to explore the many issues raised by the creation of virtual environments and to provide a glimpse into worlds that have been much discussed but rarely seen.

The book opens with eleven essays that approach the social and cultural implications of cyberspace from the perspective of cultural studies, communications, art history, art criticism, English, and women's studies. These are followed by nine virtual environments (along with statements of what the artists are trying to accomplish in both theoretical and technical terms), created over a three-year period as part of the Art and Virtual Environments Project at the Banff Centre. Together, writers and artists examine the consequences in cyberspace for race and identity, materiality and the body, landscape and narrative. Specific implications of the masculinist and rationalist biases of cyberspace are also discussed.

Preface: Douglas MacLeod. Introduction: Mary Anne Moser. Essays: N. Katherine Hayles. Cameron Bailey. Nell Tenhaaf. Frances Dyson. Allucquère Rosanne Stone. Avital Ronell. Rob Milthorp. Jeanne Randolph. Loretta Todd. Margaret Morse. Erkki Huhtamo. Artworks: Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun. Michael Scroggins and Steven Dickson. Marcos Novak. Michael Naimark. Brenda Laurel and Rachel Strickland. Perry Hoberman. Ron Kuivila. Diane Gromala and Yacov Sharir. Toni Dove and Michael Mackenzie. Will Bauer and Steven Gibson.

1995
The MIT Press
A Leonardo Book
ISBN: 0-262-13314-8
336 pp., 64 illus., 18 color

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Designing Information Technology in the Postmodern Age: From Method to Metaphor

Richard Coyne

Designing Information Technology in the Postmodern Age puts the theoretical discussion of computer systems and information technology on a new footing. Shifting the discourse from its usual rationalistic framework, Richard Coyne shows how the conception, development, and application of computer systems is challenged and enhanced by postmodern philosophical thought. He places particular emphasis on the theory of metaphor, showing how it has more to offer than notions of method and models appropriated from science.

Coyne examines the entire range of contemporary philosophical thinking -- including logical positivism, analytic philosophy, pragmatism, phenomenology, critical theory, hermeneutics, and deconstruction -- comparing them and showing how they differ in their consequences for design and development issues in electronic communications, computer representation, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and multimedia. He also probes the claims made of information technology, including its presumptions of control, its so-called radicality, even its ability to make virtual worlds, and shows that many of these claims are poorly founded.

Among the writings Coyne visits are works by Heidegger, Adorno, Benjamin, Gadamer, Derrida, Habermas, Rorty, and Foucault. He relates their views to information technology designers and critics such as Herbert Simon, Alan Kay, Terry Winograd, Hubert Dreyfus, and Joseph Weizenbaum. In particular, Coyne draws extensively from the writing of Martin Heidegger, who has presented one of the most radical critiques of technology to date.

1995
The MIT Press
A Leonardo Book
ISBN: 0-262-03228-7
408 pp.

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The Visual Mind: Art and Mathematics

Edited by Michele Emmer


Collaboration between artists and mathematicians is of greater interest today than at any time since the Renaissance. Mathematicians are looking at visual representations in new ways, while many artists today have profound interest in new technologies and new approaches. The computer revolution is very much a part of this increased fascination---as computers are used increasingly to connect the talents of artists and scientists in multidisciplinary areas of research. Various aspects of Visual Mathematics„discussions of aesthetic issues, historical perspectives and practical applications---are included in this volume, along with chapters by mathematicians who create artworks and chapters by artists who use Visual Mathematics as the basis for their art. Through discussions of the methods used to create these works, the reader is introduced to a new universe of mathematical images, forms and shapes in media ranging from drawings to computer graphics. The Visual Mind includes 36 chapters covering Geometry and Visualization, Computer Graphics, Symmetry, and Perspective, with introductions on each of these topics. The chapters are richly illustrated in color and in black and white. Michele Emmer is a Professor of Mathematics in Venice, Italy.


1993
The MIT Press
A Leonardo Book
ISBN: 0-262-05048-X
304 pp. 300 illustrations, 50 in color

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The Leonardo Almanac: International Resources in Art, Science and Technology

Edited by Craig Harris


The Leonardo Almanac is an invaluable one-stop resource for those who are working at the intersection of the arts, sciences and technology. Included are profiles of major individuals, institutions and companies active in related fields. The organizations directory alone contains more than 500 entries for artist-in-residence, fellowship, sound and music, video and holography programs. In addition, the Almanac includes an artists' Words on Works archive, a Speakers' Network, bibliographies on everything from fractals to virtual reality to multimedia, and a calendar listing of events, competitions and funding deadlines. The Leonardo Almanac covers a wide range of topics---computer graphics and animation, holography, robotics, telecommunications and art, video, computer literature, applications of artificial intelligence to the arts, applications of computers to music, and new materials in the arts. The in-depth profiles, examples of artists' works, detailed programs for educational institutions and research facilities, funding agencies, and artist-in-residence programs make this a key resource. Craig Harris is Executive Director of Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology.


1993
The MIT Press
A Leonardo Book
ISBN: 0-262-58125-6
225 pp., illustrated

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Updated 5 November 1999.

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